A Step Off The Canvas

Saturday, 18 June 2016 17:33

Art, as an expressive form, has always existed in a constant state of change and flux. Cave paintings, icons, hieroglyphics, Michelangelo's famous ceiling, Seurat's cacophony of dots, Escher's mind-bending renderings, Monet's ambiguity, Munch's expression, Pollock's splatterings, cubism, modernism… all are testaments to the diversity of the human mind and spirit. Yet, tell me this: if we can have every type of expression on a canvas, why not have art on our windows or larger walls?

I do not remember the exact thought process that led me to this question, and, to be honest, the lead up to this moment of inception is not of the greatest importance. The importance, for me, was the realization that so many of my artistic forefathers had had: it can all be done a different way. We can hang canvases and the canvas stays in the room as a static object that we can only interact with in one way: by looking at it. But what if we put the art on the windows as curtains? Then the colors and shapes would billow in the wind and glow in the sun. If we put the art on the wall as wallpaper, we could create juxtapositions and compositions within the larger canvas of a 3D space. The art would look different horizontal on the floor or voluminous as a pillow or cozy chair. In short, we could begin to create an interior in a completely new way.

“The importance, for me, was the realization that so many of my artistic forefathers had had: it can all be done a different way.”

— Irina Gorbman

Art, as an expressive form, has always existed in a constant state of change and flux. Cave paintings, icons, hieroglyphics, Michelangelo's famous ceiling, Seurat's cacophony of dots, Escher's mind-bending renderings, Monet's ambiguity, Munch's expression, Pollock's splatterings, cubism, modernism… all are testaments to the diversity of the human mind and spirit. Yet, tell me this: if we can have every type of expression on a canvas, why not have art on our windows or larger walls?

I do not remember the exact thought process that led me to this question, and, to be honest, the lead up to this moment of inception is not of the greatest importance. The importance, for me, was the realization that so many of my artistic forefathers had had: it can all be done a different way. We can hang canvases and the canvas stays in the room as a static object that we can only interact with in one way: by looking at it. But what if we put the art on the windows as curtains? Then the colors and shapes would billow in the wind and glow in the sun. If we put the art on the wall as wallpaper, we could create juxtapositions and compositions within the larger canvas of a 3D space. The art would look different horizontal on the floor or voluminous as a pillow or cozy chair. In short, we could begin to create an interior in a completely new way.

I have since worked to create art that transgresses the confines of a canvas. All of the patterns I offer are based on my original abstract compositions. The use of innovative and modern design applications allows me to create derivative patterns that can be customized for art on the windows and art on the walls - top to bottom. Soft undulations for bohemian styles, rich and deep variations for cozy alcoves, black, white, or nudes for the modern home, or bright and fun accents to brighten any space are available upon request.

Interested?

Email us via iGorbman@gmail.com or call 508-494-9772 and we can further discuss your project. With a focus on customization to meet personal tastes, these patterns can be produced on a variety of luxury fabrics such as silk, linen, and sateen as well as in more durable and commercial-grade textiles. All of these fabrics are produced in the United States, meaning that a customized piece can be available to you within three weeks.

Fabrics, accent wallpapers, upholstery, pillows, rugs - all can be done in style with one or two favorite art images. It's your choice!

333

Fun Fact

The painter Piet Mondrian, who famously only used primary colors, white and black, lines, and rectangles in his paintings, also felt that art extended beyond the canvas. His modest Parisian apartment only contained rectangular objects and only in the colors of red, blue, yellow, black, or white. He would frequently rearrange his furniture and smaller possessions around the apartment in the hopes that they would inspire his next composition.

Your Saved Item (0)